View Poll Results: What are you using to write your code?

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  • Wordpad

    29 0.63%
  • Notepad

    234 5.10%
  • Emacs

    16 0.35%
  • Gedit

    38 0.83%
  • JGrasp

    125 2.73%
  • Visual J#

    3 0.07%
  • Netbeans

    1,098 23.94%
  • IntelliJIDEA

    60 1.31%
  • Eclipse

    1,881 41.01%
  • JBuilder

    17 0.37%
  • BlueJ

    224 4.88%
  • DrJava

    98 2.14%
  • Adobe Dreamweaver

    9 0.20%
  • BBBEdit

    0 0%
  • JIPE

    1 0.02%
  • GEL

    1 0.02%
  • Vi/Vim

    40 0.87%
  • JCreator

    246 5.36%
  • TextPad

    122 2.66%
  • Other

    151 3.29%
  • Notepad++

    194 4.23%
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Thread: What are you using to write your code?

  1. #721
    kubus_ is offline Member
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    If I may join the discussion - simple text editors - my favorite is Kwrite (KDE) or Gedit (Gnome), but I'm always open for new sensations - for example anyone tried Scribes? :D
    Cheers!

  2. #722
    noone9 is offline Member
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    I am new to Java, but I am a C++/Assembly/PHP/SQL/etc professional developer.

    My recommendation is the following:
    When starting with Java you might be tempted to use an IDE but I generally think it is a bad idea. I suggest you use a simple text editor like Notepad without any syntax highlighting, code indenting, or any other feature whatsoever. The purpose of that would be become a proficient hardcoder.

    Start with console, forget about Swing and other GUI's or API's, learn the basics first. Solve complex algorithms, learn to parse data, learn the IO library, fully learn OOP/OOD, etc. Once you get the hang of all that you can use a more elaborate text editor like Notepad++, VIM, Emacs, gEdit, etc. The 'pretty' editor could serve to do more console development once you feel comfortable with hardcoding.

    When starting out it is best to fully learn how to debug your code by hand and do everything the hard way; there will be no replacement for this hard work later down the road. Meaning that you should manually compile and run your console code too.

    After you master the dynamics of core Java you can move to GUI frameworks like Swing and learn the other API's as well and for this an IDE has no comparison.

    Note that I am also a noob in Java, but this expertise comes from my knowledge of other languages/architectures. I.e. a renowned authority on Windows Development (Win32 API), Charles Petzold from Microsoft suggests a learning approach similar to this by hand coding everything until you become a proficient programmer.


    As for professional development or experienced developers, I guess Netbeans and Eclipse would be the top choices. Ironically I have used Eclipse for non-Java languages (C++ and PHP particularly) and I have found it to be a descent IDE but frankly not a favorite. In fact other than messing with it for a bit I have never used it for any serious project as I prefer other IDEs over it.

    For what I have seen Netbeans seems like a great IDE and it is about par to Visual Studio when it comes to Java, therefore I would suggest Netbeans as the development tool. I have heard a great deal of good reviews on IDEA so hopefully I'll try it out. But Netbeans is open source, free as in gratis, and it is the official IDE made by Sun/Oracle, so pretty much can't beat that? :)

  3. #723
    toadaly is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by noone9 View Post
    My recommendation is the following:
    When starting with Java you might be tempted to use an IDE but I generally think it is a bad idea. I suggest you use a simple text editor like Notepad without any syntax highlighting, code indenting, or any other feature whatsoever. The purpose of that would be become a proficient hardcoder.
    I agree with almost all of this. I really don't see how an editor that indents for you and highlights harms. It saves a heck of a lot of unnecessary hitting of the space key. Of course, if you learn to code this way, you'll find IDE's annoying later on - like I do.

  4. #724
    Eranga's Avatar
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    I'm not seen that highlighting is a bad idea, and it won't harm a lot. However without highlighting you may tend to remember keywords/reserve words. Anyway I hate auto-complete at the beginning.

  5. #725
    noone9 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by toadaly View Post
    I agree with almost all of this. I really don't see how an editor that indents for you and highlights harms. It saves a heck of a lot of unnecessary hitting of the space key.
    Quote Originally Posted by Eranga
    I'm not seen that highlighting is a bad idea, and it won't harm a lot. However without highlighting you may tend to remember keywords/reserve words. Anyway I hate auto-complete at the beginning.

    toadaly, I guess Eranga pretty much nailed my point. I think the beginner programmer should try to remember keywords, figure out compiler errors when he forgets a semi-colon ; or a closing } or added an extra ) or the like.

    I do believe that pretty editors with many features like Notepad++ are GREAT tools or even better console editors like Vim or GNU Emacs but I think the novice programmers should do things the hard way to get accustomed.


    Quote Originally Posted by toadaly View Post
    Of course, if you learn to code this way, you'll find IDE's annoying later on - like I do.

    Well frankly I don't hate IDE's and they definitely make life much easier for developers. I use NuSphere PHP Editor and Dreamweaver for PHP / XHTML / JavaScript / CSS / AJAX and I use Visual Studio or Qt Creator for C++ Development. Although I learned C++ using the pico editor on an old Unix Solaris Sparc machine back in the 90's. I just think they should be used by experienced developers who can do things the hard way because eventually you'll get stuck and if you can't hack your way around then you'll be a lousy professional (if you get there).

  6. #726
    gcalvin is offline Senior Member
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    A novice should stick with a plain-text editor and command-line tools? OK, I'll agree with that, but not for much more than a month. You've got no business calling yourself a carpenter if you can't drive a nail with a plain old hammer. But once you know how to do that, there's no sense in avoiding power tools. They can make your life quite a bit easier, and keep your concentration on the big picture, rather than on the drudgery.

    I would rank good style as much more important than choice of tools. I don't care if a novice uses Eclipse or NetBeans or Notepad as long as he chooses good class and variable names (including correct capitalization), keeps his indenting correct and consistent, and pays attention to his braces and parentheses.

    -Gary-

  7. #727
    wrior is offline Member
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    When i started with java at first i stuck with notepad an the command line editor really helped me focuse on learning the language better but when started developing for android was forced to move to the Eclipse IDE cause i just couldn't stand using Apaches Ant after about two weeks it got so annoying so i decided to download Eclipse made my life Developing Android Apps a hell of a lot easier.

  8. #728
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    Last few days I've developed a small Android application. Actually at the very beginning I stuck with the NetBeans and later one of my friends suggest me to use Eclipse. Sounds good that actually.

  9. #729
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    I don't agree with the idea of using a plain text editor with no highlighting.

    That is like saying "let's all put hand cranks on our cars and pretend the electric starter has not been invented just to see what it felt like"

    I once coded a PHP project just using notepad and it was EXTREMELY difficult for me because I could not easily distinguish between the HTML, PHP, and SQL code at a glance.

    In this day and age we all have several projects going - in this case I could only spend maybe four hours a week on this coding project - why waste half the time because there is no highlighting to make the troubleshooting go faster?

    That is my thought anyway

  10. #730
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbpersson View Post
    I don't agree with the idea of using a plain text editor with no highlighting.

    That is like saying "let's all put hand cranks on our cars and pretend the electric starter has not been invented just to see what it felt like"

    That is my thought anyway
    I like your argument but I disagree: the state of technology of cars is far more mature than the state of software development, most certainly when it comes to people who are just starting to develop something. If they don't know what happens under the hood they can never be a good mechanic.

    Slightly off topic: see what happens when those two technologies meet: software applied under the hood: cars need to be returned to the factory because of all sorts of vague bugs and errors. People are even killed because of those bugs ...

    kind regards,

    Jos
    cenosillicaphobia: the fear for an empty beer glass

  11. #731
    doomsword2001 is offline Member
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    eclipse + jedit
    eclipse =when i don't know exactly what i am doing and i need ctrl+space to auto-complete
    jedit= when i edit 4-5 classes at the same time, and watching the code of 3-4 more,

    sometimes both at the same time, when debugging (thx to linux, i keep sending instances of jedit to next wrorkspace ;] )

    if you like working on text editors i suggest that u try jedit its the best i tried so far, lots of plugins, configurable

  12. #732
    Eranga's Avatar
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    With Linux I like to work with multiple desktops. I'll keep open few text editor, and simple navigation through the desktop make life easy.

  13. #733
    bytescode is offline Member
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    Eclipse on Linux Ubuntu. Sometimes use Netbeans and also Geany :D

  14. #734
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  15. #735
    yellowledbet is offline Senior Member
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    I have used netbeans, eclipse, Dr. Java, and notepad. Eclipse and netbeans are similar but netbeans seems to hang less with auto suggestions and corrections. Dr. Java is nice if you are testing a small piece of code and if you want to play around in interactive mode, but for developing large applications it is not nearly as efficient for me. I would have to have a much better memory to even consider using Notepad instead of one of the other development environments.

  16. #736
    Debugger is offline Member
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    my first college only allowed textpad, the college im at now encourages JGrasp, but out of class are allowed to use eclipse/netbeans or whatever you desire, but some professors consider using netbeans/eclipse as "Academic Dishonesty"

    I prefer netbeans

  17. #737
    ora.adf is offline Member
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    I think if someone is a professional programmer with no java knowledge, there is no need to use notepad or other simple text editors for understanding what is happening in the background and my question is who use Oracle JDeveloper for App Development and what is your opinion about this ide?
    Last edited by ora.adf; 02-16-2011 at 01:16 PM.

  18. #738
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debugger View Post
    my first college only allowed textpad, the college im at now encourages JGrasp, but out of class are allowed to use eclipse/netbeans or whatever you desire, but some professors consider using netbeans/eclipse as "Academic Dishonesty"

    I prefer netbeans
    Second that. Also went from Textpad to Netbeans. I don't necessarily agree with the earlier posts that suggest it is better to start without an IDE. An IDE may rob you of debugging skills a bit but let's face it, when you start out most errors are stupid spelling mistakes and missing semi-colons. Less time wasting means more programming. You may even learn a few methods ahead of your class using an IDE. After I finished my first basic introduction to programming course which teaches you the fundamentals of OOP only using pseudocode, I played around with VB. Because of the IDE's assistance I quickly learned to code and managed to write a few programs. If you code syntax errors the IDE immediately points them out and you quickly learn the laws.
    Last edited by BiteMuncher; 02-19-2011 at 02:11 AM.
    Sorry, I only speak machine language. Yes or a No?:confused:

  19. #739
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    Default Netbeans.

    I only tried whit netbeans, and sometimes just for draft i used Notepad++..

  20. #740
    YAY
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