View Poll Results: What are you using to write your code?

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  • Wordpad

    30 0.65%
  • Notepad

    235 5.08%
  • Emacs

    18 0.39%
  • Gedit

    38 0.82%
  • JGrasp

    127 2.75%
  • Visual J#

    3 0.06%
  • Netbeans

    1,101 23.82%
  • IntelliJIDEA

    60 1.30%
  • Eclipse

    1,903 41.17%
  • JBuilder

    17 0.37%
  • BlueJ

    225 4.87%
  • DrJava

    99 2.14%
  • Adobe Dreamweaver

    9 0.19%
  • BBBEdit

    0 0%
  • JIPE

    1 0.02%
  • GEL

    1 0.02%
  • Vi/Vim

    40 0.87%
  • JCreator

    246 5.32%
  • TextPad

    122 2.64%
  • Other

    152 3.29%
  • Notepad++

    195 4.22%
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Thread: What are you using to write your code?

  1. #281
    Eranga's Avatar
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  2. #282
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    NetBeans at home, Dr. Java at school. Seeing that the majority uses Eclipse, I might check it out.
    "Things are made of littler things that jiggle."

  3. #283
    blackcodex is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDCAce View Post
    NetBeans at home, Dr. Java at school. Seeing that the majority uses Eclipse, I might check it out.

    Add one more choice to be learned?

  4. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDCAce View Post
    NetBeans at home, Dr. Java at school. Seeing that the majority uses Eclipse, I might check it out.
    I think it's better to get much familiar with one of an IDE. Because the first thing you have to do is, should know the way to do a complete application build.

  5. #285
    Supamagier is offline Senior Member
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    Dr. Java? Never heard of that one. ;)
    I die a little on the inside...
    Every time I get shot.

  6. #286
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eranga View Post
    I think it's better to get much familiar with one of an IDE. Because the first thing you have to do is, should know the way to do a complete application build.
    I use Dr. Java at school because we have to, but I much prefer NetBeans.

    Quote Originally Posted by Supamagier View Post
    Dr. Java? Never heard of that one. ;)
    Dr. Java is a small editor written by former students of Georgia Tech, I believe.
    "Things are made of littler things that jiggle."

  7. #287
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    Hi :),

    I'm new to this forum, but I think I have a huge experience with IDE-s. I've started learning Java with Notepad and Command prompt, and then I've moved to JBuilder.

    The main thing which I dislike in JBuilder is that it requires a lot of memory, and the second that it hasn't any comfort for working with CVS.

    After JBuilder I've switched to Eclipse, I like it very much. Then something went wrong with my project, and I switched to InteliJ IDEA, which I like the most.

    Currently I'm working on different projects, and all the projects with the different IDE-s. The main project is with IDEA, then I have a project which we are writing with Spring framework, and for this project I'm using Eclipse, at home I'm using JBuilder, and I have one other project for which I'm using NetBeans.

    I've read all the posts in this thread, and I see that there are a lot of Netbeans lovers. Generally, my point of view is that Netbeans is good IDE, but the main thing which I dislike is that as it is written in Java, suddenly in the middle of coding, there can happen some accident, I mean some exception is thrown, and so the IDE is not responsible any more, and the code which I've written and haven't saved, is lost. And this cause that you need to restart the IDE and rewrite the code again. But in general Netbeans is very comforable to use, and I don't think that it uses much memory, it works easier than Eclipse, or IDEA for example.

    And one more thing, which I've noticed by reading the posts is that everyone was talking about like highlighting keywords, etc. Due to my experience, all IDE-s using generally the same features, like highlighting the keywords, showing unused variables or methods, showing compile errors, etc, as well as all they have the general functionality like refactoring, generating methods, variables, etc. The difference between them is that this all features reveal themselves in the different ways. And also one IDE could have other more useful features than other one. One IDE could have several disadvantages which are advantages in other one, and vice versa.

    I think it depends on the personal which IDE to choose, i.e. for me after trying all these IDEs the most preferable is InteliJ IDEA, in spite of I use all other IDEs as well.

    So I've voted for InteliJ IDEA!!! :)
    TEAM = Together Everyone Achieves More :)

  8. #288
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    xcallmejudasx is offline Senior Member
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    I did my last 2 years of highschool(and first 2 years of Java) using JCreator because that was what was on the school computers. Honestly I dont really remember anything about it.

    First year of college I used JGrasp. Small, lightweight IDE that I am very fond of and still use it. Was my first introduction into a debugger and it's very simple to use.

    At work(Developer) I am using Eclipse since they are having me write RCP applications. This is a really powerful IDE, maybe too powerful for me, and was a little intimidated the first time I used it. After working with it 9hrs a day for a month I have to say I don't hate it as much as I originally did. There are tons of really cool features(refractor, class paths, inner class wrappers, etc) that are really nice. Play around with it and find out what everything does. The only downside to it I think is the debugger. I can't seem to find a way to just step to the next line, it seems to only be capable of stepping into functions and it will step DEEP down. It has taken me down to the actual compiler code before.

    All in all I love Eclipse, debugging is just more of a manual task now. Teaches me to not make mistakes because I don't want to trace through code to fix it lol

  9. #289
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    NetBeans have lots of advance feature supporting with CVS. On the main menu bar you have a separate menu for versioning in default, no need to install additional plugin for that.

  10. #290
    masijade is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcallmejudasx View Post
    The only downside to it I think is the debugger. I can't seem to find a way to just step to the next line, it seems to only be capable of stepping into functions and it will step DEEP down. It has taken me down to the actual compiler code before.
    No. It actually has a fairly nice debugger, which is also capable of remote debugging (when the process is started correctly).

    There are two "step" buttons right next to each other. "Step In" steps into whatever method is on the current line, and "Step Over" steps to the next line. But they are both there.

  11. #291
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    Most of the IDEs have three such options, Step Over, Step Into and Step Out. NetBeans has Step Over Expression as well, which step over the expression and stop debugging. It's a handy option with multiple breakpoints.

  12. #292
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    I've heard lots of great things abou tInteliJ IDEA except for the cost. For a hobbiest like myself, Eclipse is the way to go.

  13. #293
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    Actually my first Java IDE is IntelliJ IDEA. But I have to left it because of the price, as you said Fubarable. There is a free version for students, but they remove lots of features from the IDE. I don't know that version is still available. They have lots of versions for different level of programmers.

    So at the end I move to NetBeans, that's all for me. Excellent IDE I've seen so far for Java coding.

  14. #294
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    I use Notepad++ because its what i've used since i began programming and i find myself comfortable using it. Im sure though in the future i'll have a go with Netbeans or something similar.

  15. #295
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  16. #296
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    hello java peoples. I just started learning java a few days ago, and originally approached it as I had with other languages that I use; a good text editor (usually gedit) and compilation done through a terminal. this will be my first OOP language. yesterday I stumbled upon NetBeans, and although I feel like it's cheating to use tools like this, it's been nice to worry more about internals and less about repetitious coding/memorization.

  17. #297
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    It's better if you can memorize coding. But I don't think it's easy at all. You should memorize key points, like keywords, valid method and variable declarations and so on.

    Since we have intelligence IDEs for Java coding I don't know what's the point to stick on with them.

    As I said more times here, start working on light-weight editor is much much better. But no point to hang on that for the rest of your life. ;)

  18. #298
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    I write in JCreator probably because it was the IDE I was taught to use. Its pretty cool and has a lot of features I like.

    -Creates two braces when you type an open brace.
    -Lets you shift highlighted blocks of codes using tabs.
    -Clean simple environment.

    I've never tried coding in any other environment for Java so maybe I should try others. For C++ I like Dev C++ and I really hate VS

  19. #299
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnGuRuSO View Post
    I really hate VS
    Oh, for me it's not a bad IDE actually. Use it over the years, and so far so good.

  20. #300
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    i use textpad i like it but i intend to use netbeans its a little complicated for me now but i think i'll get used to it

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