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Thread: Help with Java coding assignment "the fan class"

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    Default Help with Java coding assignment "the fan class"

    Here are is assignment question: The Fan Class

    • Three static constants named SLOW, MEDIUM, and FAST with the values 1, 2, and 3 to denote the fan speeds.
    • A private int data filed named “speed” that specifies the speed of the fan, default to slow.
    • A private Boolean data field named “on” that specifies whether the fan is on, default to off.
    • A private double data field named “radius” that specifies the radius of the fan, default to 5.
    • A private string data field named “color” that specifies the color of the fan, default to “blue”.
    • A no-argument constructor that creates a default fan.
    • Accessors and Mutators for all 4 data fields.
    • A toString( ) method that returns a string description for the fan. If the fan is on, the method returns the fan speed, color, and radius in one combined string. If the fan is off, the method returns the fan color and radius along with the string, “fan is off” in one combined string.

    The Fan Application class

    • Write a test program that creates two Fan objects. Sets all values in the mutators, and calls the toString( ) method.
    • Fan Object 1 inputs:
    o Assign Fastest Speed, by passing static constant FAST. Hint pass Fan.FAST to the mutator.
    o Assign a radius 10
    o Assign the color yellow
    o Turn the fan on.
    • Fan Object 2 inputs:
    o Assign Medium Speed, by passing static constant MEDIUM. Hint pass Fan.MEDIUM to the mutator.
    o Assign a radius 5
    o Assign the color blue
    o Turn the fan off.

    Output:
    The Fan Speed is 3, color is yellow, and radius is 10.
    The Fan color is blue, radius is 5, and the fan is off.


    and here is my code thus far:


    Java Code:
    public class FanTest {
    
    	public static void main(String args[]) {
    
    		Fan fan = new Fan();
    		fan.seton$off(true);
    		fan.setcolor("yellow");
    		fan.setspeed(3);
    
    		FanTest ft = new FanTest();
    		System.out.println(ft.toString());
    	}
    
    	public String toString(){
    		Fan fan = new Fan();
    		String printme = null;
    
    		if(fan.on$off == true){
    			printme = ("Speed: " + fan.getspeed() + " Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius);
    		}
    		if(fan.on$off == false){
    			printme = ("Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius + " Fan is off!!");
    		}
    		return(printme);
    	}
    }
    
    class Fan1 {
    	private int speed = 1;
    	private boolean on$off = false;
    	private double radius = 5;
    	private String color = "Blue";
    
    	public static final int SLOW = 1;
    	public static final int MEDIUM = 2;
    	public static final int FAST = 3;
    
    
    	Fan1() {
    		this.speed = speed;
    		this.on$off = on$off;
    		this.radius = radius;
    		this.color = color;
    	}
    
    	void setspeed(int s) {
    		speed = s;
    	}
    
    	void seton$off(boolean open) {
    		on$off = open;
    	}
    
    	void setradius(double r) {
    		radius = r;
    	}
    
    	void setcolor(String c) {
    		color = c;
    	}
    
    	int getspeed() {
    		return speed;
    	}
    
    	boolean ison$off() {
    		return on$off;
    	}
    
    	double getradius() {
    		return radius;
    	}
    
    	String getcolor() {
    		return color;
    	}
    
    	class Fan2 {
    		int speed = 1;
    		boolean on$off = false;
    		double radius = 5;
    		String color = "Blue";
    
    		Fan2() {
    			this.speed = speed;
    			this.on$off = on$off;
    			this.radius = radius;
    			this.color = color;
    		}
    
    		void setspeed(int s) {
    			speed = s;
    		}
    
    		void seton$off(boolean open) {
    			on$off = open;
    		}
    	
    		void setradius(double r) {
    			radius = r;
    		}
    	
    		void setcolor(String c) {
    			color = c;
    		}
    
    		int getspeed() {
    			return speed;
    		}
    
    		boolean ison$off() {
    			return on$off;
    		}
    
    		double getradius() {
    			return radius;
    		}
    
    		String getcolor() {
    			return color;
    		}
    	}
    }

    and I am basically lost as to where the next step is to get the correct outputs. Anyone who can put this in to relatively easy terms to understand please help!! :)
    Last edited by sunde887; 08-08-2011 at 10:05 PM. Reason: Added code tags, [code]...[/code]

  2. #2
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    One problem I notice with your code is that you have added no access modifiers to anything. You should generally give all variables either public, protected, or private as the access modifier.


    edit:

    Also, it doesn't ask for you to write a new Fan classes for each fan you want to create. Instead the fan class should represent a fan, and you create new fans with the new keyword and the constructor. The inner class Fan2 has all the same methods and variables as Fan1 and is a waste.

    You also shouldn't be initializing instance variables when they are declared, they should be initialized in the constructor

    Java Code:
    public class Fan{
      private int speed = 1; //DON'T DO THIS
      ...
    }
    instead it should look like this

    Java Code:
    public class Fan{
      private int speed;
      public Fan(){
        speed = SLOW;
      }
    }
    Doing this.speed = speed in the constructor is a waste as well, you use that statement when you are passing an argument based constructor(which you aren't).

    The on$off variable name is also wrong, from the instructions it says it should be named "on", not "on$off", on also makes more sense since true for on$off doesn't make much sense logically. True for the variable name on makes sense since true would mean the fan is on, and false would mean it's off.

    Also, the toString shouldn't be in the FanTest class, it should be in the Fan class. I suggest you consider starting over on the code with just a Fan class for now.

    Java Code:
    public class Fan{
      //variables
      //constructor
      //mutators
      //accessors
      //main method
    }
    Last edited by sunde887; 08-08-2011 at 10:18 PM.
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    Default Update Fan Class Code

    Okay, here is my newly constructed Fan class

    Java Code:
    public class Fan  {
    
    		private static int speed;
    		private static boolean on;
    		private static double radius;
    		private static String color;
    
    		public static final int SLOW = 1;
    		public static final int MEDIUM = 2;
    		public static final int FAST = 3;
    
    
    			public String toString(){
    
    				Fan fan = new Fan();
    				String printme = null;
    
    				if(fan.on == true){
    					printme = ("Speed: " + fan.getspeed() + " Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius);
    				}
    				if(fan.on == false){
    					printme = ("Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius + " Fan is off!!");
    				}
    
    				return(printme);
    			}
    
    
    
    			public Fan() {
    
    				on = false;
    				speed = SLOW;
    				radius = 5;
    				color = "Yellow";
    			}
    
    
    					void setspeed(int s) {
    						speed = s;
    					}
    
    					void seton(boolean open) {
    						on = open;
    					}
    
    					void setradius(double r) {
    						radius = r;
    					}
    
    					void setcolor(String c) {
    						color = c;
    					}
    
    					int getspeed() {
    						return speed;
    					}
    
    					boolean ison() {
    						return on;
    					}
    
    					double getradius() {
    						return radius;
    					}
    
    					String getcolor() {
    						return color;
    				}
    }

    and here is the TestFan class:

    Java Code:
    public class FanTest {
    
        public static void main(String args[]) {
    
            Fan fan = new Fan();
            fan.seton(true);
            fan.setcolor("yellow");
            fan.setspeed(3);
    
    
            FanTest ft = new FanTest();
            System.out.println(ft.toString());
    
        }
    }

    I am still not getting what I am looking for.. Any help please!
    Last edited by sunde887; 08-09-2011 at 08:16 AM. Reason: Added code tags, [code]...[/code]

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    Please use code tags when posting code, it greatly improves readability. [code]...[/code]

    Better, but you still have a few small problems. First, the default constructor should make a default object. Make sure you are following the assignment, the teacher gave you specifics about what the default should start as. Be sure to adhere.

    The toString method is much simpler than you are doing it. It shouldn't create an instance of a class, instead it should just return a string representation of the data a class has. That way each fan object can have a different string representation.

    Here is a quick example of toString() from something I am working on

    Java Code:
    @Override public String toString(){
    		StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    		sb.append("Name: " + name);
    		sb.append("\n\tHealth:\t\t" + currentHealth + "/" + maxHealth);
    		sb.append("\n\tMana:\t\t" + currentMana + "/" + maxMana);
    		sb.append("\n\tStrength:\t" + strength);
    		sb.append("\n\tIntellect:\t" + intellect);
    		sb.append("\n\tAgility:\t" + agility);
    		sb.append("\n\tStamina:\t" + stamina);
    		sb.append("\n\tLevel:\t\t" + level);
    		sb.append("\n\tMelee Crit:\t" + String.format("%.2f", meleeCrit));
    		sb.append("\n\tSpell Crit:\t" + String.format("%.2f", spellCrit));
    		sb.append("\n\tDodge rate:\t" + String.format("%.2f", dodge));
    		sb.append("\n\tXP:\t\t" + currentXP + "/" + xpToLevel);
    		sb.append("\n");
    		return sb.toString();
    	}
    This is how I like to write toString(), for me it's easier to manage a large amount of information, you don't need to do this, but notice I don't create an instance of anything but StringBuilder(which is an API class). You basically want to build a string, and return it. A simpler example would be something like this:

    Java Code:
    public class Card{
      private int rank;
      private String suit;
      public String toString(){
        return rank + " of " + suit;
      }
    }
    Now I can create a few card objects and print them all, like so:

    Java Code:
    Card c = new Card();
    Card c1 = new Card();
    Card c2 = new Card();
    System.out.println(c + "\n" + c1 + "\n" + c2);
    Also, only constant variables should be static(SLOW, MEDIUM, HIGH), the variables on, speed, etc, should not be static, instead they should be regular instance variables

    Java Code:
    public class Fan{
      private int speed; 
      private String color;
      ...
    }
    Last edited by sunde887; 08-09-2011 at 08:28 AM.
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    Default

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sunde887 View Post
    Please use code tags when posting code, it greatly improves readability. [code]...[/code]

    I just became familiar with code tags, thank you for pointing that out :)

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    Default

    Duplicate post
    Thanks for the heads-up

    db
    Last edited by DarrylBurke; 08-09-2011 at 08:30 AM.

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    Alright, I fixed all of the static variables.

    However, I am confused as to how to go about simplifying my toString method. For your examples, you passing a specific value and just having it return that string. However for my purposes I need to first check whether the fan is on and then return based off of that. I am confused how to do that with the toString().


    here is my updated code:

    Java Code:
    public class Fan  {
    
    		private int speed;
    		private boolean on;
    		private double radius;
    		private String color;
    
    		public static final int SLOW = 1;
    		public static final int MEDIUM = 2;
    		public static final int FAST = 3;
    
    
    			public String toString(){
    
    				Fan fan = new Fan();
    
    				String printme = null;
    
    				if(fan.on == true){
    					printme = ("Speed: " + fan.getspeed() + " Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius);
    				}
    				if(fan.on == false){
    					printme = ("Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius + " Fan is off!!");
    				}
    
    				return(printme);
    			}
    
    
    
    			public Fan() {
    
    				on = false;
    				speed = SLOW;
    				radius = 5;
    				color = "Yellow";
    			}
    
    
    					void setspeed(int s) {
    						speed = s;
    					}
    
    					void seton(boolean open) {
    						on = open;
    					}
    
    					void setradius(double r) {
    						radius = r;
    					}
    
    					void setcolor(String c) {
    						color = c;
    					}
    
    					int getspeed() {
    						return speed;
    					}
    
    					boolean ison() {
    						return on;
    					}
    
    					double getradius() {
    						return radius;
    					}
    
    					String getcolor() {
    						return color;
    				}
    }
    and

    Java Code:
    public class FanTest {
    
        public static void main(String args[]) {
    
            Fan fan = new Fan();
            fan.seton(true);
            fan.setradius(10);
            fan.setcolor("yellow");
            fan.setspeed(3);
    
            Fan fan2 = new Fan();
            fan.seton(false);
            fan.setradius(5);
            fan.setcolor("Blue");
            fan.setspeed(2);
    
    
            FanTest ft = new FanTest();
            System.out.println(ft.toString());
    
        }
    }
    Last edited by broo7198; 08-09-2011 at 08:54 AM.

  9. #9
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    Well you know that the toString method will be called on an already initialized fan object, so you know that each variable will be initialized when the toString method is called, therefore, you can use any instance variable of the fan class as if they were already initialized. So you can test the on variable in the toString method. If it's true, return one string, otherwise return the other.


    As a side note, try not to cross post(post the same thing on multiple forums), keeping can be annoyed to help someone out only to be ignored by them. If you are coming here, post the question here and hang tight. More than likely you will get a very quick response here(same with other forums, just stick to one), if your post goes a few days without a response, perhaps then it's time to go to another forum.
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    Did you see sunde's example? It used a StringBuilder to "construct" a new String. You should use that approach as well as using one or more if statements.
    Java Code:
    private String text;
    private int value;
    
    // constructor to initialise variables
    
    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        builder.append("Text: ");
        builder.append(text);
        builder.append(System.getProperty("line.separator"));
        builder.append("The number ");
        builder.append(value);
        builder.append(" is ");
        if(value % 2 == 0) {
            builder.append("even");
        } else {
            builder.append("odd");
        }
        return builder.toString();
    }
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    sorry again for causing headaches around here! I am new, show me mercy please :)

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    here is my attempt @ the new toString() method, but is not compiling. 6 different "Cannot Find Symbol" errors.

    Java Code:
     public String toString(){
    
    				StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    
    				String printme = null;
    
    				if(fan.on == true){
    					builder.append("Fan Speed: " + fan.getspeed + " Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius);
    					}
    				else {
    					builder.append("Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius + " Fan is off!!");
    					}
    
    				return builder.toString();
    
    			}

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    Declaring printme is a waste since you are using a StringBuilder instead. When comparing a boolean, adding the '== true' is unnecessary. What values can '== true' evaluate to? True or False, if the variable being tested is true, it returns true, so why bother taking the long way? Anything that takes a boolean condition doesn't care what the statement is, as long as it evaluates to true. So you can do if(true), if(on), etc.

    Next, you don't have a fan object in the toString method(and you shouldn't), so you get the cannot find symbol errors. Since you are working in the class you can access the variables directly. Instead of fan.on, use on, instead of fan.color, use color. You can also make this more elegant by doing something like:

    Java Code:
    append color
    append radius
    append statement based on 'on' variable
    Finally, to explain why I use StringBuilder rather than String concatenation(+(and another reason why you should append small strings at a time, rather than one string made up of many)).

    Using concatenation on strings is slow. Each time it is used it creates multiple copies of the strings. With append it simply adds it to what is already on the stringbuilders array of characters. StringBuilders are quicker and should be used when many concatenations are required.
    Last edited by sunde887; 08-09-2011 at 09:19 AM.
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    no I am still struggling with this toString() method, and how to use the append command. Here is my latest draft of the code, still not compiling however...


    Java Code:
    public String toString(){
    
    				 private String sp;
    
    				StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    
    					builder.append(sp);
    
    				if(fan.on == true){
    					builder.append("Fan Speed: " + fan.getspeed + " Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius);
    					}
    				else {
    					builder.append("Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius + " Fan is off!!");
    					}
    
    				return builder.toString();
    
    			}

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    Java Code:
    builder.append("Fan Speed: " + fan.getspeed + " Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius);
    The toString method is inside the Fan class (I hope) so you do not have a fan variable. What you do have is direct access to the Fan objects instance variables. Just append speed and colour etc. Also, you should be using an append statement for each separate bit of data. Otherwise you could have just done
    Java Code:
    return "Fan Speed: " + fan.getspeed + " Color: " + fan.color + " Radius: " + fan.radius;
    (if it was correct)
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    If you are a beginner, you may want to use regular string concatenation. If the teacher doesn't mind you getting advice, stick to it. But seeing you using a string builder rather than simple string concatenation may lead him/her to believe you may have cheated. Many new coders don't know that StringBuilder is quicker, and are more accustomed to the easier string concatenation.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunde887 View Post
    If you are a beginner, you may want to use regular string concatenation. If the teacher doesn't mind you getting advice, stick to it. But seeing you using a string builder rather than simple string concatenation may lead him/her to believe you may have cheated. Many new coders don't know that StringBuilder is quicker, and are more accustomed to the easier string concatenation.
    My professor encourages using our resources to receive aid outside of class. "As long as you're writing code and trying you best to understand it, you
    re learning".

    anywho,

    I finally got my new toString() method finished and compiled! Here is my entire code. My final problem rests in getting the desired output.

    Java Code:
    public class Fan  {
    
    		private int speed;
    		private boolean on;
    		private double radius;
    		private String color;
    
    		public static final int SLOW = 1;
    		public static final int MEDIUM = 2;
    		public static final int FAST = 3;
    
    
    			public String toString(){
    
    
    
    				StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    
    
    
    				if(on){
    					builder.append("Fan Speed: ");
    					builder.append(speed);
    					builder.append(" Color: ");
    					builder.append(color);
    					builder.append(" Radius: ");
    					builder.append(radius);
    					}
    				else {
    					builder.append("Color: ");
    					builder.append(color);
    					builder.append(" Radius: ");
    					builder.append(radius);
    					builder.append(" The Fan is OFF!!");
    					}
    
    				return builder.toString();
    
    			}
    
    
    			public Fan() {
    
    				on = false;
    				speed = SLOW;
    				radius = 5;
    				color = "Yellow";
    			}
    
    
    					void setspeed(int s) {
    						speed = s;
    					}
    
    					void seton(boolean open) {
    						on = open;
    					}
    
    					void setradius(double r) {
    						radius = r;
    					}
    
    					void setcolor(String c) {
    						color = c;
    					}
    
    					int getspeed() {
    						return speed;
    					}
    
    					boolean ison() {
    						return on;
    					}
    
    					double getradius() {
    						return radius;
    					}
    
    					String getcolor() {
    						return color;
    				}
    }
    and
    Java Code:
    
    public class FanTest {
    
        public static void main(String args[]) {
    
            Fan fan = new Fan();
            fan.seton(true);
            fan.setradius(10);
            fan.setcolor("yellow");
            fan.setspeed(3);
    
    
    
            Fan fan2 = new Fan();
            fan.seton(false);
            fan.setradius(5);
            fan.setcolor("Blue");
            fan.setspeed(2);
    
    
    		FanTest ft = new FanTest();
            System.out.println(ft.toString());
    
        }
    }

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    One thing I'd like to point out. Much of the code in your toString method is independant of what the on variable is. The value of the on variable should only append one thing.

    Java Code:
    public String toString(){
    
    
    
    				StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
                                    //append stuff that's independent of on's value
    
    
    				if(on){
    					builder.append(" Radius: ");
    					builder.append(radius);
    					}
    				else {
    					builder.append(" The Fan is OFF!!");
    					}
    
    				return builder.toString();
    
    			}
    broo7198 likes this.

  19. #19
    sunde887's Avatar
    sunde887 is offline Moderator
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    Finally, you don't need to create an instance of FanTest, the class just has the main method for the JVM to enter. From the main method you create and print the fan's you created(remember, we moved toString to be a member of Fan, and not FanTest). Also, you are mis setting the speed. The instructions tell you to use the variable names rather than the number. So you would do

    Java Code:
    Fan f = new Fan();
    f.setSpeed(Fan.SLOW);
    To set the speed of the fan.
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  20. #20
    broo7198 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunde887 View Post
    One thing I'd like to point out. Much of the code in your toString method is independant of what the on variable is. The value of the on variable should only append one thing.

    Java Code:
    public String toString(){
    
    
    
    				StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
                                    //append stuff that's independent of on's value
    
    
    				if(on){
    					builder.append(" Radius: ");
    					builder.append(radius);
    					}
    				else {
    					builder.append(" The Fan is OFF!!");
    					}
    
    				return builder.toString();
    
    			}
    So i should append the rest of the variables outside the if/else parameters?

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