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  1. #1
    357mag is offline Member
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    Default When the time comes to make Windows programs...

    Right now I'm using Crimson Editor to write my Java programs. I'm just doing simple console programs and I like Crimson Editor. It's easy to use and I can even compile and execute my program right from within the editor.

    But I was thinking...

    Let's say I get to the point where I want to start using Java to learn how to write some Windows programs. Probably nothing too complex but beginning type things.

    Will using an IDE be a better choice for making GUI programs? Or will Crimson Editor do just as good of a job? Crimson Editor is just a text editor that you can use for different languages and it works great for writing code.

    I just tried Eclipse with Java and I liked what I saw. Actually got it working this time. Was wondering if I should switch to Eclipse?

  2. #2
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    sunde887 is offline Moderator
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    You don't need any special editor for GUI applications, it's possible on a simple notepad. You just need to know how to use the swing packages.

    Trail: Graphical User Interfaces (The Java™ Tutorials)

  3. #3
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    You don't really need anything special to develop on any platform with Java. Seeing as the Java libraries are universal, the only thing that would classify your program as windows only is if you use exclusive parts of the Windows operating system.

    And like sunde said, GUI is just Java Swing. All an IDE does for you is make your life easier, so its not recommended for learning. They have gui editors, that build your layout the way you want it visually with a lot less trouble than manually coding it. However if you don't understand swing, you shouldn't be using an editor anyways.
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  4. #4
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    DarrylBurke is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark View Post
    All an IDE does for you is make your life easier, so its not recommended for learning. They have gui editors, that build your layout the way you want it visually with a lot less trouble than manually coding it.
    Not so. The typical J. Ava Noob just ends up with a pretty face that has no brains behind it. The sensible ones turn to hand coding until they understand what the generated code is all about, and what can be done -- then return to the visual designer to learn how to do the same thing there.

    The dumbos ask vague, often unanswerable, questions here, and feel highly insulted when told to learn swing the proper way.

    @357mag: Your text editor is just fine for learning. Does it have code completion and syntax/error highlighting? You'll want those two time-saving features for anything more complex than a Swing "Hello World"

    db

  5. #5
    Dark's Avatar
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    Let me rephrase what I meant then, IDE's make your life easier by providing you with tools to speed up design including things like a gui editor. Using the advanced tools in an IDE is not recommended for learning the basics.
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  6. #6
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    Not just 'not recommended for learning'. It actually makes the whole creating-a-functional-gui process more difficult. Tangentially, it also makes it more difficult to get help on a forum as the said J. Ava Noob hasn't even learned that default variable and method names coined by the GUI designer should immediately be changed to something meaningful, and post well-nigh incomprehensible code here. Most of the time, they don't even know that the names can be changed, let alone how to do it.

    db
    Last edited by DarrylBurke; 06-23-2011 at 08:18 AM.

  7. #7
    Dark's Avatar
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    Ok, you have had a bit of experience in that area I see. I haven't messed around with a GUI Editor yet seeing as I'm still learning Swing. I wasn't aware of anything the editor even had to offer, so your further explanation just attests to why you shouldn't use it until you know Swing.
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  8. #8
    yellowledbet is offline Senior Member
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    The thing I like most about some of the more robust GUIs is the auto-complete features. It makes things easier to remember and makes me much more productive as the programs grow in size. I still prefer to create the GUIs by hand as I don't like fussing with generated code.

  9. #9
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    I enjoy the fact that Eclipse gives me a little menu box with all the methods of an object when I type place the period after the object. I spend less time looking in the API for the proper spelling and arguments on things I've already learned but haven't used frequently.
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