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  1. #1
    turboscrew is offline Member
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    Default Beginner - which bundle to install?

    I've been searching the net for info about which java development bundle I should install, but haven't found an answer. I have also searched this forum, but no help, so:

    I'm hoping to start from the very beginning and advance to the EE. I'd also like to learn at least something about netbeans, fx, applets, java scripting and other java-related stuff. At the moment I have no clue what those are.

    I guess, for the beginner the SE JDK is mostly recommended - sometimes SE JDK with netbeans, but if I wanted to install the widest option, should I install EE JDK? Maybe EE JDK with GlassFish?

    Can you do everything you can do with SE JDK with EE JDK or does basic learning become harder with EE JDK? Or maybe EE JDK is addition to SE JDK?
    Oracle Technology Network for Java Developers does not seem to give an answer to this question. At least not using language a total noob can understand.

    The idea is to install most, if not all, needed stuff at once and then concentrate on using them in writing java programs.

    Also, could anybody explain the bundles - roughly what they are for, and what you can do with them.

    I tried to ask about those things in the Oracle Community Java Forum, but couldn't register. Couldn't even ask how to register. Is it even alive anymore? The latest articles seem to be dated to stone age.

    I guess Eclipse would be a good IDE?

    Some background:
    I'm a senior SW designer with more than 15 years of experience - mostly C.
    I'm also somewhat familiar with C++, Ada, Pascal, Fortran, Basic, Forth, Occam, Lisp and Common Lisp (Not really a Lisp, IMHO), so this is not my first attempt to learn a programming language.

    I'm also trying to learn Windows programming these days, so Windows programming concepts are somewhat unknown to me still, so please try to avoid those concepts in responses.

  2. #2
    jojo is offline Member
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    You must have a copy of the JRE (Java Runtime Environment) on your system to run Java applications and applets. To develop Java applications and applets, you need the JDK (Java Development Kit), which includes the JRE.

    Java SE Downloads

    download update 25, then youll have everything you need to start.. you can download bundles later if you want :)

  3. #3
    turboscrew is offline Member
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jojo View Post
    You must have a copy of the JRE (Java Runtime Environment) on your system to run Java applications and applets. To develop Java applications and applets, you need the JDK (Java Development Kit), which includes the JRE.

    Java SE Downloads

    download update 25, then youll have everything you need to start.. you can download bundles later if you want :)
    JRE I know. It's installed - even our banking systen requires it if you want to pay bills in net.

    Any pointers to explanations of the bundles?

  4. #4
    pbrockway2 is offline Moderator
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    Default

    Mostly the information is on Oracle's web site. Eg JDK 6 vs 7: Java SE Overview - at a Glance,
    OpenJDK: Java SE Overview - at a Glance, etc

    There will be overviews of the technologies at Wikipedia.

    -----

    It might be a mistake to try and decide what you want then download everything. For one thing there will doubtless be updates in the time it would take to survey the literature... There are zillions of options and such an approach risks beginning a breadth first search to nowhere.

    If you are beginning Java, download the JDK and use it with whatever IDE you use now. Then decide on other technologies as you go. (in line with your experience and goals as well as what you read about the technologies.)

  5. #5
    turboscrew is offline Member
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    Still didn't get the difference of SE and EE, or what fx is.

  6. #6
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    DarrylBurke is offline Member
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    Default

    JavaFX isn't Java, just as JavaScript isn't Java.

    Just go with pbrockway2's advice: download the JDK. And go through the links he posted.

    db

  7. #7
    turboscrew is offline Member
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    Do you mark the question as answered somehow?
    If, then how?
    Does the tic on the circle in front of the thread name in the thread list indicate that the question is answered, or what is it ?

    BTW, Can I try java applets with this SDK?
    Does this have all the tools?
    Last edited by turboscrew; 05-15-2011 at 08:36 PM.

  8. #8
    pbrockway2 is offline Moderator
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    Yes, the JDK is what you use for writing applets.

    One more link that more directly addresses the question of "getting going" is Oracle's Tutorial. A glance through the big index lists the major aspects of the language (or platform or whatever it is...). The Tutorial does a really good job - given that it's an introduction - of being comprehensive.

  9. #9
    SubZero is offline Member
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    Default Books - Where to get started

    Before even beginning to code, take a look at some sources of other projects. If you want, I can give you some code ( Extremely Beginner ) and explain the blocks that are used to create and operate the actual application.

    After sifting through code for awhile (I did it for days), take a look at your local library. Try to find Java for Dummies for a start, and then make way to other Java books. I am currently reading Programming with Java and it's also a great introduction to Java.

    With Java you have to create and test your own code, reading from a book constantly will not do you any good. You are required to be making your own applications during the time of reading the book you are on.

    If you need more information, please don't hesitate to contact me.

  10. #10
    turboscrew is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbrockway2 View Post
    Yes, the JDK is what you use for writing applets.

    One more link that more directly addresses the question of "getting going" is Oracle's Tutorial. A glance through the big index lists the major aspects of the language (or platform or whatever it is...). The Tutorial does a really good job - given that it's an introduction - of being comprehensive.
    By "tutorial" you mean the links under "Trails Covering the Basics"?
    The "reallybigindex" looks like even the kitchen sink is there. :-)
    Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by SubZero View Post
    Before even beginning to code, take a look at some sources of other projects. If you want, I can give you some code ( Extremely Beginner ) and explain the blocks that are used to create and operate the actual application.

    After sifting through code for awhile (I did it for days), take a look at your local library. Try to find Java for Dummies for a start, and then make way to other Java books. I am currently reading Programming with Java and it's also a great introduction to Java.

    With Java you have to create and test your own code, reading from a book constantly will not do you any good. You are required to be making your own applications during the time of reading the book you are on.

    If you need more information, please don't hesitate to contact me.
    Thanks for the code offer. I just might contact you later.
    At the moment I'm reading a bit too simple book (15+ years of professional SW development mostly in C): "Java Now!" by Kris Jamsa. It's ancient (1996), but I happen to have it. I guess the very basics haven't changed that much.
    A Java book can't get any more basic than that. :-)

  11. #11
    turboscrew is offline Member
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    Now, how do you mark the question as answered? It's already needed. :-)
    Does the tic on the circle in front of the thread name in the thread list indicate that the question is answered, or what is it ?

    BTW, the Jamsa's book seems to be about applets only. :-(
    Well, I guess the basics are there - especially the Java language basics.
    Got to find another book in due time...
    Last edited by turboscrew; 05-19-2011 at 03:50 PM.

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