View Poll Results: How long did it take you to learn Java?

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  • Less than 2 months

    1 9.09%
  • 2 months to 6 months

    1 9.09%
  • 7 months to 1 year

    4 36.36%
  • 1 year+

    5 45.45%
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    ohhcrapitstim is offline Member
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    Default Any tips for the beginner developer?

    I have been interested in developing apps for awhile now, the iPhone's app store really set me off. I decided to go with Java first, and then learn C++ or whatever the iPhone is coded in. Anyways I have the following CDs from Sun Micrsosystems:

    SUN Microsystems JAVA Training Courses:

    Fundamentals of the Java Programming Language (CDJ-110A)
    Java Programming Language (CDJ-275A)
    Developing Applications for the Java EE Platform (CDJ-310)
    Developing Applications for the J2EE Platform (CDJ-310A)
    Web Component Development with Servlet and JSP Technologies (CDJ-314A)
    Advanced Business Component Development with Enterprise JavaBeans Technology (CDJ-351A)
    Introduction to Mobile Java Technologies (CDJ-450)
    Mobile Desktop Development with Java Technologies (CDJ-455)
    J2ME and Mobile Phone Development Topics (CDJ-460)


    I started with Fundamentals of the Java Programming Language yesterday, and when I finish I am going to move on to Java Programming Language. Then I am going to do the Mobile Desktop Development with Java Technologies course. And lastly, J2ME and Mobile Phone Development Topics. Any suggestions or tips? I have tried learning java about 6 months ago from javapassion.com but it was not very easy or helpful. I figure the Sun Microsystems will do a better job.

  2. #2
    Eranga's Avatar
    Eranga is offline Moderator
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    You MUST learn Java basis first of all, means J2SE, standard Java. Then after better to move J2ME, Micro Edition, which required for mobile application developments in certain level. Suns' have different resource available related with your requirements. But selecting the right one is not an easy task. You have to decide that. Why I'm say that is once you get a clever idea about the basis, you can decide yourself to choose the best.

  3. #3
    Eranga's Avatar
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    Regarding your pool. In sense, I'm learning Java everyday, since I start work on Java around 8-10 years ago. So voting on your pool may be kind of difficult (may be for other members as well ) ;)

  4. #4
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    I voted the '1 year+' option; I started with Java from (almost) the start in the mid 90s in the previous century and still I haven't seen every single class from its core distribution, mainly because I don't need them all. I'd say it takes 10 years or more to become fluent in any language.

    kind regards,

    Jos

  5. #5
    Eranga's Avatar
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  6. #6
    m00nchile is offline Senior Member
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    In a sense, you never really learn a language, but a way of thinking and mastering certain concepts. For me, learning a language is just knowing its strong and weak points, so you know what way to implement the general algorithm you think up.

  7. #7
    Eranga's Avatar
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    I think that's happen because of the experience. Learning a new language by an experienced programmer and a one for the first time, have a huge different.

    I really believe that, when I'm start work in IT, it took months to learn VB. But now it's not that much difficult after 8-10 years. As you said, the key point is the learning strong/weak points is must. And I would like to add one more thing, learning the concepts is much useful. In most of the cases, the concept is the same.

  8. #8
    yinkus191 is offline Member
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    Hi,

    Where can i get the link to download the SUN Microsystems JAVA Training Courses as mentioned in the initial post?

  9. #9
    Eranga's Avatar
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  10. #10
    cselic is offline Senior Member
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    I voted 1+ :D

    Java is not difficult at all.
    1. the best way to learn Java is writing programs (1% theory, 99% practice).
    When you only listen/watch course you are in passive position, and you
    are not interested in Java.
    But when you listen/watch something and start to "investigate", or "explore" thats the best. When you listen/watch for example something with Strings then you should experiment with String code, think, ask people to tell you something about Strings, search on the internet about Strings,...
    Do it with a big passion.
    2. If at first something is not easy to understand it then re read it, listen it again, watch it again. When I start learning PROLOG it was very difficult.
    I have read books over and over again. After 5-6 times of reading a books + big practice and exploring I become a master :-)

    I came to Java from C/C++, but its not necessary to learn C/C++ first, you should go to Java directly.
    Last edited by cselic; 05-06-2010 at 06:01 PM.

  11. #11
    gcalvin is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ohhcrapitstim View Post
    I decided to go with Java first, and then learn C++ or whatever the iPhone is coded in.
    It's Objective C, and the development kit runs only on Macintosh computers. You can develop Android apps in Java, though.

    Android SDK | Android Developers

    I strongly recommend you take a look at the Mark Dexter tutorials pretty early on.

    Eclipse and Java for Total Beginners

    -Gary-

  12. #12
    cselic is offline Senior Member
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    I decided to go with Java first, and then learn C++
    It's better to go with C first, and then learn C++, and than you should think if you want to learn Java.
    Practices of my colleagues programers (and my practice too) is: learn C, then learn C++, then learn Java :cool:

  13. #13
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