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Thread: Need Help

  1. #1
    kLo
    kLo is offline Member
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    Default Need Help

    I am currently enrolled in a java programming class, and would like to learn more about java. My professor is pretty knowledgable about java and other programming languages which makes it very difficult for me to learn in his class because he teaches as though everyone else knows how to program using java already.

    I'm not here to get help with homework or anything like that. I would just like to learn more about java. So far I've been pretty lost in the class. I have only understood 2 assignments, but only because they were easy, but now it seems as though the assignments are n times much harder. It's as if one lecture went from teaching the basics of programming a "hello world" program to programming video games. I'm in need of a lot of help with java.

    There's no tutors on campus that help with java or any computer programming, so i was hoping i could come here and get some guidance.

  2. #2
    Fubarable's Avatar
    Fubarable is offline Moderator
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    We'll be happy within our capacity to help, and to better understand that capacity, please have a look at the FAQ section of the forum. We fail miserably however at being a substitute for a tutor or a teacher, so I will have to tell you now that in order for you to succeed, you'll likely benefit by finding / hiring a tutor, either that or go through on your own a basic Java text or the Sun Java tutorials. Either way, you're going to have to work very hard in order to catch up. Best of luck with your studies.

  3. #3
    paul pasciak is offline Senior Member
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    Default Poor instructors in technology courses

    Your problem is probably universal.
    Teaching, and teaching methods,
    have never been seriously studied.

    It is likely that a teacher in a
    technology class is not there because
    he or she is a great teacher, but
    most likely has been a great student.

    In watching your 'teacher' you are
    actually witnessing the performance
    of the smartest student in your class.
    Any instruction you glimmer from his
    or her performance, you aquire by
    chance.

    MY OBSERVATION:
    The stupidest teachers do next to
    nothing other than repeatedly put
    example after example on the board,
    (I can look in a book to find example
    after example.) and add no insight,
    or even focus on the concept the
    lesson is supposed to cover.

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    chrono25 is offline Member
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    Heheh , i hear you , i too got a job of programming without even knowing how to declare a variable, but i learned by myself! so its up to you to self educate yourself, there's a ton of java tutorials in the interwebz, so just ask google or go to javabegginer dot com ( cant put links yet ). good luck mate!

  5. #5
    kLo
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    Thanks guys. I hope i can grasp java as quickly as possible before i lower my grade any lower hah. I have looked through some tutorials, and they helped a bit, but the homeworks that we get are few and the range of the difficulty of each one becomes more difficult with each one applying so many different new methods that its hard to keep up. Well, i'll try hard to learn and look through some of the faqs on this board. Thanks again guys.

  6. #6
    chrono25 is offline Member
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    One thing is for sure though, at least in my own personal experience, you can a read a million books but that's not gonna compare to real hands-on experience, so keep on practicing!

  7. #7
    pbrockway2 is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul pasciak View Post
    Your problem is probably universal.
    Teaching, and teaching methods,
    have never been seriously studied.
    I don't know. I work in a highschool and my observation is that teaching methods are grossly over studied. Many of the nostrums being peddled are truly whacky: often commercial and always a public relations exercise.

    Mercifully the good teachers go on being good teachers despite all the pedagogery that's thrown at them. But I find that at least some students are taken in by it and will celebrate their lack of logical analytic and reasoning skills (and their lack of application) as some sort of "individual learning style". Good luck with that!, as they say.

    (Of course, I'm not pointing at the OP, about whom I know nothing.)

    Sorry about the rant...

    @OP: There's no magic bullet - not a teacher, a textbook or an API. If you don't get enough (or suitable) problems to work on, make up your own! This is difficult to start with but becomes easier as you are introduced to more, and more useful, techniques.

    And take advantage of forums to engage in dialog (something that is often not possible in modern classrooms). Ask specific questions, with code. (Framing questions is difficult - if it wasn't they wouldn't be questions.) Read, reflect and work on the responses, but don't be afraid to post back if there is something in a reply that you don't understand (or that you think is wrong.)

  8. #8
    paul pasciak is offline Senior Member
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    Default 'Education' is a vast problem

    I agree with your perspective that
    education is over studied.

    To modify my comment:
    Education is under studied because
    it is incompletely studied.

    Fads dominate the education arena.
    Their flaws are ignored by the talentless
    dimwits who dominate the education
    colleges. They are implemented without
    testing or proving them.

    An overwhelming percentage of
    'Education Philosophy' is actually dogma.

  9. #9
    emceenugget is offline Senior Member
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    if you're in college and you have a professor, then tough luck. these guys aren't paid to teach, they're paid to research. they just have to lecture (not teach) in addition to their research. and guess who teaches programming classes most of the time: either the professor who always does it/was never good at it/doesn't care because he has more important things to do, or the new guy who doesn't know what he's doing.

  10. #10
    pbrockway2 is offline Moderator
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    @Paul - Yeah I think we're mostly saying the same thing.

    My slant is to point out that it doesn't let the student "off the hook". Our learning begins with our own curiosity and ends with our own understanding. And it gets there through our own efforts. Even if silly educational fads make the task more difficult, the solution still lies with the student.

    That said, there is nothing wrong (and everything right) with those efforts being cooperative. Forums like this provide a magnificent venue for such cooperation.

    (Of course there are others. And, as has been mentioned, forums have their limitations.)

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