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Performance issues related to Look and Feel of GUI

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by , 11-19-2011 at 06:15 PM (1312 Views)
When you use Java Swing or Java Foundation Classes (JFC) for your GUI application development the look and feel of GUI application is not the same as the look and feel of your operating system as JFC or Java Swing has its own built in look and feel. Although, if you want you can achieve the same look and feel as of your operating system's by using Java's Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT), the AWT toolkit is unable to meet advanced GUI programming requirement.


The Java Foundation Classes (JFC) or Swing toolkit is written completely in Java. It re implements widgets that are guaranteed to be available on all platforms and removes disadvantage of being limited by native toolkit capabilities. However, it certainly has disadvantage that it gives a different look and feel. Programmer has to take a special care to set the native look and feel to have applications which looks similar to your operating systems native applications. The default installations of the JRE also gives the built-in Metal Look and Feel and not operating systems native look and feel.

To overcome this you can use the Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT) to develop your GUI applications where you can have same look and feel as of your operating system as well as you can have access to advanced widgets. SWT is an open source widget toolkit for Java designed to provide efficient, portable access to the user-interface facilities of the operating systems on which it is implemented.

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Tags: awt, java swing, jfc, swt Add / Edit Tags
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Performance

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